These Never-Fail Methods Deliver Perfectly Fluffy Long-Grain Rice Every Time

These Never-Fail Methods Deliver Perfectly Fluffy Long-Grain Rice Every Time

If you’ve ever stood in a grocery aisle pondering the differences between jasmine, basmati, and long-grain white rice — and if those difference even matter when it comes to how you cook and use them — then this is the place for you. The long-grain rice category is plentiful and common, so there’s lots to learn about this light and fluffy grain.

All rice is classified as either short-, medium-, or long-grain based on its length-to-width ratio when cooked. Long-grain is slender and lengthy — four to five times longer than it is wide. This classification of rice includes long-grain white, basmati, and jasmine rice, plus long-grain brown rice. Because long-grain rice is light and dry when cooked, it’s ideal for pilafs, side dishes, or salads where you want the grains to retain a distinct separateness. 

How Should You Cook Long-Grain Rice?

Stovetop? Oven? A countertop appliance? No matter what you cook your long-grain rice in, we have the best method.

How to Cook Long-Grain White Rice on the Stove

Measure 1 cup long-grain white rice into a fine-mesh strainer, and rinse under cool running water until the water runs clear. Bring 1 1/2 cups water to a boil in a small saucepan over high heat. Stir the drained rice, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and (optional) 1 tablespoon butter or oil into the boiling water. Cover, reduce the heat to low, and simmer until the water is absorbed, 18 to 20 minutes. Remove the pan from heat and let stand, covered, for 10 minutes. Fluff with a fork and serve.

How to Cook Long-Grain White Rice in an Instant Pot 

Measure 2 cups long-grain white rice into a fine-mesh strainer. Rinse under cool running water until water runs clear. Combine drained rice, 2 cups water, 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt, and 1 tablespoon butter in the pot. Lock the lid in place and set to cook under High pressure for 5 minutes. Allow the pressure to naturally release for 10 minutes, then carefully quick release any remaining pressure. Fluff with a fork before serving.

How to Cook Long-Grain White Rice in a Rice Cooker

First, always check your manual to see if it offers specific instructions for long-grain white rice. Measure the rice with the cup that came with your rice cooker, then rinse it in a fine-mesh strainer. Add the rinsed, drained rice to the pot, then add salt to taste and water to the level indicated for white rice (rice cookers should have markings inside the pot). If you don’t have a rice cooker cup or markings inside the pot, try a ratio of 1 cup rice to 1 cup water. Set to cook using white rice mode. Let the rice stand in the closed cooker for 10 to 30 minutes after cooking, then fluff and serve.

How to Bake Long-Grain White Rice in the Oven 

Preheat the oven to 375°F with rack in the middle of the oven. Combine 1 cup long-grain white rice and 1 teaspoon kosher salt in a 2-quart baking dish; add 2 tablespoons butter (it’s fine if it’s cold). Bring 1 3/4 cups water to a boil in a small saucepan or tea kettle. Pour the boiling water over the rice mixture, stir, and spread the rice in an even layer. Cover the dish tightly with foil and bake for 25 minutes. Remove from the oven and let the dish rest, covered, for 5 minutes. Fluff with a fork and serve.

How to Cook Long-Grain White Rice in a Slow Cooker 

Coat a 6-quart slow cooker with cooking spray. Add 3 cups white long-grain rice, 6 cups water, and 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt and stir once. Cover and cook on the High setting for 1 1/2 to 2 1/2 hours, until water is absorbed and rice is tender, stirring about every hour. Fluff with a fork before serving.

How to Store Long-Grain White Rice

Store uncooked long-grain white rice in your pantry, either in its original packaging or in an airtight container, such as a Mason jar or tightly lidded plastic container. 

How Long Does Long-Grain Rice Last? 

Our Favorite Long-Grain Rice Recipes

Long-grain white rice is incredibly versatile. Use the tender, fluffy grains in soups, sides, casseroles, one-pot dinners, and more.

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